Image via Ghost Robotics In what looks like a pretty worrying development, a robodog has been given a sniper rifle, firmly strapped to its unsuspecting back, and the reason or purpose behind this is largely unknown. According to gun manufacturer Sword International, the weapon is a Special Purpose Unmanned Rifle (SPUR). This, it writes, was “specifically designed to offer precision fire from unmanned platforms.” It’s able to operate in a “magnitude of conditions” and is “the future of unmanned weapon systems.” The “latest lethality” innovation was shared on…

Image via Hellenic Post The staff at the Hellenic Post in Greece are very different to the workforce at many other postal centers around the world. They’re small, sport four wheels, are made of bright yellow plastic, and whirr as they work. Powered by artificial intelligence and rechargeable batteries, 55 of these autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) are in charge of the parcel sorting process. Introduced to the Hellenic Post Group in mid-August, they’ve settled into the new routine quite well. Scanning and weighing parcels as well as emptying…

[Click here to view the video in this article] Video screenshot via Caltech Like a legendary polymath of the same name, LEONARDO the flying drone is paving the way for new innovations. Its name is short for LEgs ONboARD, so—you guessed it—it walks too. Now that you’re acquainted, you can call this bipedal robot LEO, which is the nickname its inventors at Caltech prefer to call it by. LEO can transition between walking and flying, which is more challenging to accomplish than it really sounds. To make a…

Rather than relying on expensive and unreliable thermal cameras, this new search and rescue drone uses an array of microphones to zero in on cries for help. View original article at Digital Trends

With the help of some clever smartphone-sniffing technology, this innovative new search-and-rescue drone could help first responders save lives. View original article at Digital Trends

A tank that drives itself. A drone that picks its own targets. A machine gun with facial-recognition software. Sound like science fiction? Weapons powered by artificial intelligence are already here. Original article at nytimes.com

Artificial intelligence has bested top players in chess, Go and even StarCraft. But can it fly a drone faster than a pro racer? More than $1 million is on the line to find out. Original article at nytimes.com

Amazon just received a patent for hijack-proof delivery drones. The company filed a patent titled “Hostile takeover avoidance of unmanned vehicles” two years ago, and it was finally approved last week. The patent is specifically designed for delivery vehicles, and its aimed at preventing “nefarious individuals” from taking over the company’s drones. Although there’s no guarantee that this patented technology will ever see the light of day, it’s still considered a major development — especially for an e-commerce giant like Amazon — since it could revolutionize the company’s delivery…

Researchers from the U.K. and India have developed a new drone-based surveillance system, which uses A.I.-equipped drones as flying security cameras to identify violent incidents from the sky View original article at Digital Trends

We may not have reached the age where we can drive flying cars just yet, but that doesn’t mean the age of AI isn’t already here. You’ve probably been encountering AI-driven things more than you realize.  Perhaps Netflix has recommended a show or film you’ve always been meaning to watch. Or your GPS has saved you from sitting in hours of traffic. Or maybe your text messaging app has already predicted what you’re going to say next View original article at Mashable