A tank that drives itself. A drone that picks its own targets. A machine gun with facial-recognition software. Sound like science fiction? Weapons powered by artificial intelligence are already here. Original article at nytimes.com

A host of regulatory issues have slowed the progress of drone-delivery companies but they are making some progress and lots of tests are underway. Original article at nytimes.com

A former military airfield in Belgium will be used to test technology and help regulators set rules for delivery by unmanned flying devices. Original article at nytimes.com

The British Civil Aviation Authority will allow the company to test several technologies that the United States has not permitted. Original article at nytimes.com

There are many steps before you can get airborne, including finding a safe area and learning the federal and local regulations. Original article at nytimes.com

As the Federal Aviation Administration begins to assert its authority to regulate drones, local lawmakers contend the agency’s efforts do not go far enough in protecting privacy and public safety. Original article at nytimes.com

DJI, a maker of small-scale drones, is adding so-called geofencing technology that would prevent the aerial devices from going into certain areas, like the skies over a forest fire. Original article at nytimes.com

The government says requirements to register drones will be simple enough that owners will not need to pay a “drone registration” company to do it for them. Original article at nytimes.com

The transportation secretary wants the system in place by December, but some drone makers are concerned about the details, which will be determined by a task force. Original article at nytimes.com

Proposed regulations requiring daylight flights with craft always being kept in sight might ground planned delivery services like Amazon’s Prime Air. Original article at nytimes.com