Amazon is coming for your hands.  Not content to put a flying surveillance drone inside customers’ homes, the surveillance behemoth on Tuesday announced a plan to scan and store the “unique palm signature” of an untold number of Americans. Dubbed Amazon One, the company hopes the network of scanners will one day serve as an all-purpose form of identification.  You should absolutely not participate. Since the introduction of Apple’s Touch ID in 2013, followed by Face ID in 2017, many people have become desensitized to using biometric data…

On social media, people had some concerns about the Ring Always Home Cam. To put it mildly. Original article at nytimes.com

Amazon’s nightmare surveillance network is going mobile.  Not merely content to film both the outside and inside of your home from fixed points, the company announced Thursday a Ring drone that will fly around the interior of your home, shooting and livestreaming video in the process. Say hello to the Always Home Cam, a product that’s very existence poses the question: What the absolute fuck is Amazon thinking? According to Amazon, its latest connected monstrosity will cost $249. And don’t worry, an Amazon liveblog made clear that this…

Thousands of protesters are filling the streets of American cities to protest the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, and police brutality writ large. Police officers have shown they’re more than willing to escalate violence with pepper spray, tear gas, rubber bullets, vehicles, and other dangerous crowd suppression measures. In addition, law enforcement are likely heavily surveilling protests with all sorts of tech and spying gear. Already, we've seen a Customs and Border patrol drone flying over Minneapolis protests. It's not just the cops that…

Jon Callas is an elder statesman in the world of computer security and cryptography. He’s been a vanguard in developing security for mobile communications and email as chief technology officer and co-founder of PGP Corporation—which created Pretty Good Privacy, the first widely available commercial encryption software—and serving the same roles at Silent Circle and Blackphone, touted as the world’s most secure Android phone. As a security architect and analyst for Apple computers—he served three stints with the tech giant in 1995-1997, 2009-2011, and 2016-2018—he has played an integral…

If you’re a Timehop user, we’ve got some really bad news. The app, which reminds you of your past social media postings, says it was hacked on July 4. Timehop says some 21 million users are affected by the data breach, which exposed information such as names, email addresses, and phone numbers. SEE ALSO: Amazon patents hijack-proof delivery drones In a company blog post, Timehop says although it learned of the hack while it was happening and was able to interrupt it, “data was taken.”  The cause of…

Imagine using an app to summon an aerial drone to deliver you a late-night snack. Running low on battery after a long day, the machine needs to recharge on the way. It finds a nearby rooftop charging station to refuel, then drops your General Tso’s on your balcony. The drone pays the charging station, and your digital wallet pays the drone. It all happens automatically, and the transactions are pseudonymous and recorded on a decentralized public ledger known as a blockchain View original article at Motherboard

Forget 2049. Los Angeles’ Blade Runner-esque future of a world watched by robots is here.  On Tuesday, a civilian oversight panel gave the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) the OK to begin a year-long drone trial, primarily for reconnaissance in “tactical missions” conducted by SWAT. The decision came after a contentious meeting and protest by privacy advocates who oppose the use of drones by law enforcement. SEE ALSO: Only in Dubai—police now have hovercrafts As the third largest police force in the nation behind New York and Chicago,…

Sitting at work all day scrolling through Facebook is almost definitely frowned upon by your bosses, but Facebook wants to change that with the launch of a new version of Facebook—specifically designed for work—called Workplace.Facebook is ubiquitous. If it’s not Mark Zuckerberg handing out “Free Basics” to developing countries, it’s internet connectivity beamed down from giant, solar-powered drones. As of July 2016, the social network had 1.71 billion monthly users View original article at Motherboard

A few days ago, the American Civil Liberties Union published 18 hours of spy plane footage from Black Lives Matter protests, and multiple investigations have identified the front companies used by the FBI and tracked thousands of flights.Now, a presentation released to Motherboard under the Freedom of Information Act details how the FBI briefs pilots and agents about its aviation programs.The “Indoctrination to Bureau Aircraft Operations” presentation comes in three parts, and is dated April 2009. Across over 330 pages, the Field Flight Operations Unit spells out a…