Enlarge / The Boeing/Saab T-X has won the Air Force’s advanced jet trainer contract. (credit: Boeing) The end-of-the-year contract rush for the US Defense Department has been good to Boeing. As the clock ticks down on the fiscal year, Boeing grabbed its third DOD contract in a month. This time, it’s the Air Force’s T-X next-generation advanced jet trainer contract. Boeing’s joint bid with Swedish aerospace company Saab came in more than 50 percent below the Air Force’s initial cost estimate, shutting out Lockheed and the US subsidiary…

Enlarge / The MQ-9 Reaper isn’t a fighter aircraft. But it could soon be armed to take out other drones, helicopters, or other aircraft, after a successful kill with a heat-seeking missile in a November 2017 test. (credit: US Air Force) The US Air Force has revealed that an MQ-9 Reaper uncrewed aircraft successfully shot down a smaller drone with a heat-seeking air-to-air missile in a test last November. The details, provided by Col. Julian Cheater, commander of the 432nd Wing, came in an interview with Military View original…

Enlarge / Boeing’s MQ-25 unmanned aerial refueler, known as T1, is currently being tested at Boeing’s St. Louis site. T1 has completed engine runs and deck handling demonstrations designed to prove the agility and ability of the aircraft to move around within the tight confines of a carrier deck. (Photo: Eric Shindelbower, Boeing) (credit: Boeing ) The US Navy has awarded Boeing an $805 million contract to construct four prototypes of its design for the MQ-25 “Stingray.” The uncrewed, carrier-based tanker aircraft will help extend the range of…

Enlarge / The Disclose.io project: open source contracts to keep white-hat hackers and developers out of legal trouble. (credit: Disclose.io) Not a week goes by without another major business or Internet service announcing a data breach. And while many companies have begun to adopt bug bounty programs to encourage the reporting of vulnerabilities by outside security researchers, they’ve done so largely inconsistently View original article at Ars Technica

The Rotem “suicide drone” in action. In early July, Israel Aerospace Industries demonstrated the Rotem UAS—a proof-of-concept quadcopter drone capable of providing both airborne surveillance and an explosive punch. The lightweight drone, which can be carried in a backpack and flown by one person, comes with a “combat head” that turns it into a guided weapon. Rotem folds down into a package 38 inches long, 7 inches wide, and 5 inches high. According to a report from Israel Defense, the drone has a number of “automated modes View…