Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is letting two of its pet projects fly free. The company announced today in a Medium post  that its internet-delivery balloon project Loon and delivery drone project Wing will become independent companies. Both Loon and Wing will “graduate” from Alphabet’s secretive research subsidiary dubbed “X.” The skunkworks laboratory is known for nurturing experimental projects that work toward solving big problems, all with the aim of launching those projects as full-fledged independent businesses. They are often referred to as “moonshot” projects View original article at…

Friday afternoon, Gizmodo reported that Google would not renew Project Maven—its contract with the military to develop image-recognition AI—when it expires next year. A Google executive cited a wave of negative attention the company experienced from pursuing the project as a main reason for not renewing the contract. Nevertheless, top Google executives defended the company’s work on the project and didn’t say whether Google would be leaving the military business entirely. This was a telling omission, considering that Google is actively pursuing a multi-billion dollar cloud computing contract…

Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory recently conducted the ultimate test of artificial versus human intelligence: drone racing. JPL capped off two years of drone autonomy research (funded by Google) with an October […] The post JPL Pits Human Against AI in Drone Race, But Who Wins? appeared first on Geek.com. View original article at Geek

Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California recently pitted a professional human drone pilot against racing drones controlled by artificial intelligence. Guess who came out on top? The post Watch NASA’s A.I. race a pro drone pilot — you’ll never guess who wins appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

The extremist jihadist cleric Anwar al-Awlaki was killed in a U.S. drone strike six years ago. But until this month, he was the leading English-speaking jihadist recruiter through more than 70,000 videos posted on YouTube.  Three-quarters of those videos are now gone from YouTube’s archives, the New York Times reported Sunday View original article at Mashable