It’s almost 11pm in Australia, but Guy Pearce is full of energy. He’s talking about robots. The star of Memento and L.A. Confidential has just been in a film called Donny the Drone — a post-apocalyptic short in which an initially friendly-looking robot (voiced by Pearce) is given a humanitarian award View original article at Mashable

AT&T is hooking bridges up to the Internet of Things.  At CES, AT&T announced that it’s testing a new “structure monitoring solution,” a system of sensors to help cities, states, and private transportation companies monitor the stability of bridges, and alert officials if they become unsafe.  SEE ALSO: China’s futuristic cities may include supersonic trains and drone-powered ride-sharing The sensors can be applied to all bridges, from foot bridges to those that support roads and railways.  AT&T will announce customers over the next several months. Some cities and…

Researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory recently conducted the ultimate test of artificial versus human intelligence: drone racing. JPL capped off two years of drone autonomy research (funded by Google) with an October […] The post JPL Pits Human Against AI in Drone Race, But Who Wins? appeared first on Geek.com. View original article at Geek

Enlarge / Robo-cranes load cargo onto the robo-boat Yara Birkeland in this rendering of the drone ship, under construction in Norway. (credit: Konsberg Gruppen) SpaceX’s drone landing ships have already proven that uncrewed vessels can handle some of the most dangerous jobs at sea. Now, two Norwegian companies are poised to put robo-boats into one of the most dull: hauling cargo down the fjord. Two Norwegian companies are teaming together to construct a short-range, all-electric coastal container ship that will eventually operate autonomously—eliminating up to 40,000 diesel truck…

Kalashnikov Group, the Russian company behind the iconic AK-47 assault rifle, claimed it has invented an artificial intelligence capable of identifying targets on the battlefield and making decisions. That’s right: a military AI, presumably with the power to decide for itself who the enemy is and whether to attack. It’s a startling claim. But don’t panic. There are good reasons to doubt the AI—assuming it’s real—is actually very useful in combat View original article at Motherboard