Enlarge (credit: University of Aberdeen) On a hilltop overlooking a small Scottish village lie the buried remains of the largest settlement in medieval Britain. About 4,000 people lived within the community’s earthen ramparts during its heyday in the 400s and 500s CE. That’s around the time the Picts of northeastern Scotland were banding together into kingdoms to defend themselves against rival groups. Until recently, archaeologists assumed the fortified community was much older and much smaller. But a recent lidar survey, combined with excavations on the hill, revealed a…

Enlarge (credit: Barbour et al. 2019) A team of archaeologists and its trusty drone are revealing an island community that once supplied valuable beads to the inland towns of the Mississippian culture, which thrived in the eastern United States from 800 to about 1600 CE. The supply end of an ancient trade network A drone armed with laser beams discovered the remains of a long-lost culture on Raleigh Island, off the north coast of Florida. The high-resolution aerial laser scans mapped a massive complex of 37 oyster-shell rings,…

Archaeologists have unearthed a Byzantine church, believed to be the Church of Apostles, at the site of el-Araj, on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee. (Photo Credit: Center for the Study of Ancient Judaism and Christian Origins) Archaeologists have unearthed remnants of a large church from the Byzantine period in the shore of the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel, and they say the ancient structure is the Church of the Apostles, a site said to have been built over the house of Jesus’ disciples Peter…

Back in 1845, explorer John Franklin left England with two ships, the HMS Erebus and Terror, to find a way through the storied Northwest Passage—which, back then, was mostly locked up in year-round ice. Things didn’t go well. The ships disappeared, as did Franklin and his crew, spawning a mystery that’s become the stuff of legend.In 2014, a Canadian expedition finally found the remains of the HMS Erebus in the labyrinthine waters around Nunavut, a northern territory that includes most of the Canadian Arctic archipelago. Now they’re going…

For over two-thousand years, a massive, mysterious structure has been hiding in plain sight at the ancient desert city of Petra.Two archaeologists, who recently published their findings in the American Schools of Oriental Research, used Google Earth satellite images and drone photography to identify the outline of an enormous monument buried beneath sand and time at the UNESCO World Heritage site in Jordan.An aerial view of the monument taken via drone; A graphic overlay of the monument’s surface features. Image: I. LaBianca; J View original article at Motherboard

The Band of Holes in a photograph taken by drone. The road stretches for a mile up a mountain top, and may be the remains of a structure used for collecting and measuring food tributes for the Inca state. (credit: Charles Stanish) The Inca Empire covered vast parts of South America, uniting distant cities in Chile, Peru, and even Argentina with well-engineered highways. Sophisticated agricultural systems and architecture allowed the Inca to live on the steep slopes and jagged peaks of mountains. And they did it all without money…

Artist’s depiction of using radiographic muons to peer inside pyramids. Image: HIP InstitutePyramids, the final resting places for ancient Egyptian pharaohs and queens, are pretty awesome to look at. But what’s just as fascinating for archaeologists, engineers, and the public is getting to the bottom of a 4500-year-old mystery: how were they built?In an attempt to answer that question, a team of researchers from Egypt, Canada, France, and Japan have joined forces under the aegis of the ScanPyramids Project, which is supported by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities….