Over the past few years, drones have become the “it” gadget — and for good reason. “Kids” (and kids at heart) love to steer a high-tech hovercraft, while photographers can capture selfies and breath-taking aerial shots. 
SEE ALSO: 3 best drones for capturing epic aerial photos and videos
The only problem is that most drones are overpriced and unnecessarily large. If you’re trying to keep the fact that you still play with toys under wraps, carrying around a giant $500 drone is probably not the best look. That’s where SKEYE’s Mini Drone comes in for the save

View original article at Mashable

When the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie, that’s a… quadcopter. YouTubers deDrones, who previously raced drones through abandoned ships and crafted ghost drones, embarked on a cheesy challenge with their latest video: Make a flyable quadcopter out of pizza—sauce, cheese, and all

View original article at Motherboard

Enlarge / A General Atomics MQ-9 Reaper. (credit: USAF / Airman First Class Adarius Petty)
Despite protests from employees, Google is still charging ahead with a Department of Defense collaboration to produce machine-learning software for drones. Google hasn’t listened to a continent of its employees that are unhappy with Google’s involvement in the military-industrial complex, and now a report from Gizmodo says “about a dozen” employees have resigned over the issue.
The controversial program is called “Project Maven,” and it has Google applying its usual machine-learning and image-recognition expertise to millions of hours of drone footage collected by the military. The goal is to identify people and objects of interest

View original article at Ars Technica

As we reported back in March, Google has been working with the United States Department of Defense (DoD) on “Project Maven,” a secretive military project involving AI.

View original article at TechSpot

Mini indoor drones have become an incredibly popular gift in the last few years since they’re both cool and inexpensive. For a while they’re great fun to fly around, until the inevitable collision with a wall, piece of furniture, or family member. Often not the most structurally sound of products, a slightly damaged quad can easily be confined to a cupboard for the rest of its life. But [Peter Sripol] has an idea for re-using the electronics from a mangled quad by building his own RC controlled paper aeroplane.
[Peter] uses the two rear motors from a mini quadcopter to provide the thrust for the aeroplane

View original article at Hack A Day