United States Senators have removed a provision in an intelligence bill that would have forced President Obama to publicly reveal information about people killed during drone strikes. The move comes at the request of the director of national intelligence, James Clapper. So much for transparency.Read more.

View original article at Gizmodo

Mankind might not be able to fly yet, but until that day comes it seems we’re pretty happy to simulate the experience by strapping cameras to everything from falcons , to drones , to now even frisbees. Although that last one requires a cleverly-designed mechanism so that the footage from a flying, spinning disc isn’t completely sickening.Read more..

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Image: Sen. Dianne Feinstein via YoutubeCISPA is back for a third time—it has lost the ‘P,’ but it’s just as bad for civil liberties as ever.The Senate Intelligence Committee is considering a new cybersecurity bill that contains many of the provisions that civil liberties groups hated about the Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). Most notably, under the proposed bill companies could not be sued for incorrectly sharing too much customer information with the federal government, and broad law enforcement sharing could allow for the creation of backdoor wiretaps.The bill, called the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act of 2014 (embedded below), was written by Senate Intelligence Chair Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif

View original article at Motherboard

The Goosebuster in action. Image: Gerd BrauneWhile American Predator drones drop missiles on suspected terrorists in Yemen, one Canadian drone maker is deploying his “Goosebuster” on packs of pesky geese pooping on a beach in Ottawa, Ontario.After city officials tried using dogs, pungent fertilizers, and human decoys to ward off nesting geese, whose prodigious poop output was leading to dangerously high E. coli levels on a public beach on Petrie Island, they turned to Steve Wambolt, an-ex IBM and Corel employee who designed a hexicopter system fit with lights and blasting predator noises.“I spent a couple weeks researching and coming up with the lights and sounds to add to the drone,” said Wambolt who originally tried to sell the city a means to survey property using his remote control drone system

View original article at Motherboard

Mashups of bleeding-edge technology are the lifeblood of innovation, and one team of experimenters may have outdone themselves by combining the Oculus Rift with a flying drone.
Using a DJI Phantom 2 and the hottest virtual-reality headgear on the market, a group from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology created a mechanism that gives wearers a real-time, first-person view from the drone’s perspective
See also: This Oculus Rift Game Will Scare the Crap Out of You
The team mounted a pair of cameras to the drone, which allows wearers to look around in any direction, while it hovers in the sky. The drone is controlled by servomotors that move the cameras in the direction that wearers turn their head. Read more.

View original article at Mashable