If you’re looking to up your selfie game, why not invest in some pocket-sized drones that can take awesome aerial photos of you and your friends? These three drones can help make your most memorable hangouts even more ‘grammable by shooting them from above like an action movie.

Flyington Selfie Drone — 12% off
The Flyington Selfie Drone is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand but can flip, roll, and slice through the air like a Top Gun graduate. It takes real-time videos and photos that can be transmitted directly to your phone, which can also be used to fly using tilt controls and a companion app. There’s even a one-button landing option, so you never need to worry about crashing this little guy. Normally the Flyington Selfie Drone sells for $79

View original article at Mashable

Parachutes can save drones when they unexpectedly fall from the sky. Among a number of such systems, Austrian firm Drone Rescue is this week showing off its latest design that automatically deploys when it senses trouble.
The post Here’s a useful solution for saving clumsy drone pilots a few bucks appeared first on Digital Trends.

View original article at Digital Trends

[Project Malaikat] is a 3D printed hybrid bipedal walker and quadcopter robot, but there’s much more to it than just sticking some props and a flight controller to a biped and calling it a day. Not only is it a custom design capable of a careful but deliberate two-legged gait, but the props are tucked away and deployed on command via some impressive-looking linkages that allow it to transform from walking mode to flying mode.
Creator [tang woonthai] has the 3D models available for download (.rar file) and the video descriptions on YouTube contain a bill of materials, but beyond that there doesn’t seem to be much other information available about [Malaikat]. The creator does urge care to be taken should anyone use the design, because while the robot may be small, it does essentially have spinning blades for hands

View original article at Hack A Day

Ever seen a bit of graffiti in a strange location and wondered how the graffiti artist got up there? It might have been a drone rather than an athletic teen. Disney research has just published an interesting research paper that describes the PaintCopter: an autonomous drone fitted with a can of spray paint on a pan-tilt arm. It’s more than just sticking a paint can on a stick, though: they built a system that can scan a 3D surface then calculate how to paint a design on it, and then do it autonomously. The idea is that they want to use this to paint difficult-to-reach bits of theme parks, or to add seasonal decorations without sending someone up a ladder.

The PaintCopter is built from a DJI M100, with an Nvidia TX2 and Intel UP processor boards added to give it some more processing power

View original article at Hack A Day

Most civilized nations ban the use of landmines because they kill indiscriminately, and for years after they are planted. However, they are still used in many places around the world, and people are still left trying to find better ways to find and remove them. This group is looking at an interesting new approach: using ground-penetrating radar from a drone [PDF link]. The idea is that you send out a radio signal, which penetrates into the ground and bounces off any objects in there. By analyzing the reflected signal, so the theory goes, you can see objects underground

View original article at Hack A Day