Parrot drone in action. Image: ParrotNot unlike the gun market, where consumer AR-15s aren’t dissimilar in performance to a military grade M-16, consumer drones aren’t all that different from their commercial counterparts. And in Canada, the line between the two is still murky.Recently, French outfit Parrot signaled its entry into the Canadian consumer drone market with an official media launch party in Toronto. Part of its plan is to deliver affordable drones to average Canadians looking to make family videos or scenic landscape shots of their backyard

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MiamiHerald.comLegal memo backing drone strike that killed American Anwar al-Awlaki is releasedWashington PostA federal court on Monday released a previously secret government memo outlining the legal justification for the 2011 killing of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S

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Image: Flickr/Unten44The Federal Aviation Administration made it clear today that it plans to continue trying to screw over anyone using drones without its authority, including those who fly them as part of a business and those who participate in first person view flight—the fastest-growing part of the hobby.Citing “many inquiries” about its drone rules (remember: it doesn’t have any) and a bunch of highly-publicized events in the last couple months, the agency issued a policy statement that, at points, delves into the absurd (check out the table comparing “hobby or recreation” activities with “not hobby or recreation” ones). Most importantly, the agency is trying to assert that commercial flight of drones is illegal, despite there being no official, legally-enforceable regulations against it—a point that the FAA has already lost in court (an appeal is still pending). It’s also trying to make the same tired argument that if a drone is used for a commercial purpose, it ceases being a “model” aircraft and becomes a standard one—the exact same argument a judge threw out just months ago. The document also tries to say that these new rules are already in effect, and have been for roughly two years

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Fox NewsMemo justifying drone killing of American Al Qaeda leader is releasedLos Angeles TimesA screenshot of a video of Anwar Awlak,i released in September 2010 by the SITE Intelligence Group. A screenshot of a video of Anwar Awlak,i released in September 2010 by the SITE Intelligence Group. (AFP/Getty Images)

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doctress neutopia/flickr

A secret Obama administration memo disclosed Monday outlines the legal justification for the government’s drone-targeted killing program, a lethal strategy that authorizes the killing of innocents as collateral damage.
The memo (PDF), released by a US federal appeals court under a Freedom of Information Act request, describes the government’s legal underpinnings for its so-called overseas targeted-killing program where drones from afar shoot missiles at buildings, cars, and people. It began under the George W. Bush administration but was broadened under Obama and now includes the killing of Americans.
The Obama administration fought for years to keep the Justice Department Office of Legal Counsel memo from becoming public

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