One of the biggest issues faced by anyone with a great idea is how to get people aware of it. And with marketing looking to gain more cut-through and create genuine buzz, they’ve now combined the idea of drones and advertising to create flying billboards.

Dronevertising is the brainchild of Russian ad agency Hungry Boys. Their first campaign was for Asian restaurant chain Wokker, putting an ad for the chain on a series of drones, then hovering the flying billboards in the windows of high-rise office buildings at lunchtime.
The result? A 40 per cent increase in Wokker’s sales and, according to Hungry Boys, the creation of “a buzz” around Wokker “in all European advertising media”

View original article at Techly

Imagine Humvees equipped with small landing pads for armed quadcopters sent to attack targets, then autonomously return and land safely, all while the car is in motion, no less.With Humvees already set to have lasers to protect infantrymen against the weaponized UAVs of the future, adding more drones to the mix doesn’t seem like an outlandish idea—especially when Canadian researchers at McGill University in Montreal are developing new software for UAVs to autonomously land. What you’re seeing above appears to be the early stages of this drone software, being demonstrated at the lab level. In March, the McGill Daily, a student run newspaper at the university, unearthed documents showing the university participating in over a million dollars in research helping the Canadian Department of National Defence to develop software for quadcopters in combat operations. (The research caused a minor controversy on campus when students protested to “Demilitarize McGill” and blockaded the drone research labs

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“PFFFFTTTTTT! WE ALREADY KNEW THAT!” was a common response from some people when last summer’s Snowden leaks revealed that the NSA was monitoring American communications. And in some ways, they were right. We already knew a lot thanks to PBS documentaries. So what PBS documentary will we point to when we learn that the eye-in-the-sky surveillance movie Enemy of the State was frighteningly prophetic ? Probably NOVA’s “Rise of the Drones” from January of 2013.Read more

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The omnipresent watching aircraft of dystopian science fiction has quietly become science fact. Meet Wide Area Aerial Surveillance, the all-seeing eye in the sky that will change our lives forever. Read more..

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Earlier this month, first responders in China used drones to determine the hardest-hit areas following a massive earthquake that killed more than 600 people, in one of the first displays of how drones can be used during emergency situations.One of the great promises of drones is the technology’s inherent ability to be flown above a disaster site, giving first responders a survey of the situation and allowing them to direct where to send aid to. But, until now, that’s been more of a theoretical benefit of drones—very few people have actually used them in the immediate aftermath of a disaster. Take, for instance, the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan last year in the Philippines: Tons of search and rescue helicopters, but not a single drone, searched for survivors. Well, after an earthquake hit Yunnan, China, earlier this month, rescue workers there called up Hong Kong’s DJI (the largest commercial drone manufacturer in the world), and asked its pilots for help

View original article at Motherboard