Think that autonomous flying taxis are decades away? Think again! Volocopter is gearing up to run inner-city tests of its self-driving air taxis in Singapore in the second half of 2019. The post Singapore plans to open its skies to drone taxi test flights in 2019 appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

These diminutive Flycrotug microdrones are able to open doors or move objects 40 times their weight — and all they need are a pair of adhesive, insect-inspired feet, and an onboard lasso. The post Uh-oh. Somebody taught drones how to team up so they can open doors appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

Enlarge / Women soldering components at a factory in Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China. (credit: Yann Layma / Getty Images) Today we present the third and final installment of my interview with Chris Anderson. He was Wired magazine’s editor-in-chief for 12 years and then started one of the most influential companies in the brief history of consumer drones. Please check out parts one and two if you missed them. Otherwise, press play on the embedded player or pull up the transcript—both of which are below View original article at…

Named the FlyCroTug, the device can navigate through snug spaces and weighs a little over three ounces, no more than two golf balls. It was created at Stanford University in California. View original article at Daily Mail Online

In the latest installment of DT Daily, we talk about the day’s biggest headlines, modern drone regulations, and Sony’s forthcoming robotic dog, Aibo. Streamer Disguised Toast also makes an appearance to talk Twitch. The post DT Daily: Drone-snatching eagles, streamer Disguised Toast, and more appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

Sometimes you need to hack on the go. [Supertechguy] has put together an interesting system for hacking on the hoof called the Pineapple Pi. This combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with a seven-inch touchscreen and a Hak 5 WiFi Pineapple into a handy portable package that puts all of the latest WiFi and ethernet hacking tools to hand. The package also includes a 20,100 mAh battery, so you won’t even need a wall socket to do some testing. It’s a bit of a rough build — it is held…

On Thursday, Brendan Byrne and Dhruv Mehrotra are hosting INTERNAL USE ONLY in Brooklyn, where they will be displaying the satellite image they bought, as well as artwork by Sebastian Gladstone. The longest amount of time any area in the continental United States has gone without an update on Google Earth has been 8 years. From 2008 to 2016, a series of dry lake beds in Southwestern Nevada located in the Tonopah Test Range was a blind spot from the all-seeing corporate monolith continuously mapping the Earth. After…

Enlarge / AAAAAH IT’S COMING RIGHT TOWARD ME! (credit: Lee Hutchinson) Today we’re presenting the second installment of my wide-ranging interview with Chris Anderson. He was Wired magazine’s editor-in-chief for 12 years and then started one of the most influential companies in the brief history of consumer drones. Part one ran yesterday. If you missed it, click right here. Otherwise, you can press play on the embedded audio player, or pull up the transcript, both of which are below View original article at Ars Technica

Enlarge / Chris Anderson (left) doing drone stuff. (credit: Chris Anderson & 3D Robotics / WikiMedia Commons) This week, we’re serializing another episode of the After On Podcast here on Ars. Our guest was the editor-in-chief of Wired magazine for twelve years—until he did something quite unusual for an editor and started a high-profile, venture-backed startup. Specifically, 3D Robotics—which played a genuinely historic role in the rise of consumer drones (if a phenomenon that young gets to have historic players). Chris Anderson doesn’t have the background you might…

OpenROV’s cheap robots help people explore their local waterways, and National Geographic is helping get them to more people so they can map their discoveries. Since David Lang cofounded OpenROV, a low-cost underwater drone company, in 2012, thousands of citizen scientists and explorers have used the bots to explore things like starfish deaths in the Pacific Northwest, or where along the coast of Mexico Nassau grouper tended to spawn. That information launched bigger efforts to study, document, and ultimately try to protect those species and the places they live.Read…