Google is over 4G internet and wants to beam 5G to you from the sky The company is now experimenting with solar drones that deliver 5G Internet, reports The Guardian. See also: Australia will have a 5G network by 2020, says Vodafone CTO The project, called SkyBender, involves several prototype transceivers and multiple drones, which are housed at Virgin Galactic’s Gateway to Space terminal in New Mexico’s Spaceport America. Information about the secret project, which is part of the Google Access team that includes Project Loon, was gleaned…

It’s a trick known to almost every kid who has been to school camp, but as it turns out, a homemade flame thrower can have some real world applications. Two men with what appeared to be firearms tried to rob a store in Queensland’s Alexandra Hills at 6:30 a.m. local time Saturday, Queensland Police told Mashable Australia. Not taking that lying down, store owner Dan Rigney took up the weapons available to him to defend his shop: fly spray and a cigarette lighter View original article at Mashable

We’ve seen a couple of brute force anti-drone devices designed to snatch the tiny machines out of the sky, but Battelle’s DroneDefender is one of the first to do it with an invisible beam delivered in an ultraportable, gun-like form The device uses radio control frequency disruption to halt and bring down drones in a way that keeps the drone intact while preventing it from setting off any kind of self-destruct sequence See also: 2016 will be the dawn of the drone age That last point is important…

KBIS brings us bear-proof glass, glow-in-the-dark toilet seats, and pizza ovens, Caleb’s eagerly anticipating 4K Ultra HD Blu-rays, Google build a drone to take deliveries from other drones, and Softbank’s Pepper robot will sell you a phone but won’t give you a back rub. The post Trends with Benefits: Detroit-style pizza, 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, robot back rubs appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

Image: ZanoThe Zano drone was one of Kickstarter’s most popular crowdfunding campaigns of all time, raising £2.3 million in late 2014. A year later, that money was gone, the drone’s creator was on the verge of a nervous breakdown, and the company’s 13,000 backers were out of luck. What happened? Kickstarter hired freelance journalist Mark Harris to conduct an investigation into the drone’s parent company, Torquing. Harris spent five weeks interviewing Torquing employees, going through the company’s financial documents, and even checking out the company’s headquarters in Whales…