It’s Halloween, so people are ready to believe in a little magic, which is exactly what happened when a fake Aladdin made his way through Manhattan on what looked like a magic carpet just before Halloween Crafted by the always clever Casey Neistat, the “magic carpet” is in fact nothing more than a remote controlled, jerry-rigged item that we’re all very familiar with. We don’t want to ruin the surprise so, if you must know, the answer is here. And to add yet another tech twist, Neistat documented…

While drones are banned from most ski resorts, a San Francisco startup, Cape Productions, has been authorized to provide drone video service at select resorts, giving skiers and snowboarders awesome aerial shots of their rides. The post With drones as filmmakers, these ski resorts let you leave camera at home appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

(credit: Kevin Baird) This concludes 2015’s Ars UNITE virtual conference. Thanks for reading, watching and participating! You can catch all the past sessions and articles here. On Friday, Ars Gaming Editor Kyle Orland and I hosted a live 30-minute chat on drones and discussed what, if anything, we should fear from them. One thing we kept coming back to throughout our conversation was how new and ambiguous the regulatory and legal environment is. Can you shoot down a drone if it’s threatening you? How much airspace do you control…

(credit: Microdrones Gmbh) Friday marks the fifth and final day of Ars Unite, our week-long virtual conference exploring the horizons and boundaries of the future of technology. We’re saving the best for last, which means drones! These flying toys and/or death machines have become increasingly commonplace—so much so that earlier this month, the federal government said that the devices will now need to be registered. We’ll be jabbering about what new drone pilots should know before they fly and where the legal landscape is taking us, all over on…

T•Mobile may exempt streaming video from data caps, guy who took a shotgun to a drone beats the rap, Harrison Ford’s legacy of awkward interviews hits a hilarious new high. The post No charges for drone slayer, Harrison Ford is a hot dog: DT Daily appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

The DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ and its gimbal-stabilized camera, doin’ its stabilization thing in flight. (credit: Steven Michael) Welcome to Ars UNITE, our week-long virtual conference on the ways that innovation brings unusual pairings together. Today, we examine the one population that may secretly shape the future of drone use in the US. Join us this afternoon at 1pm Eastern (10am Pacific) for a live discussion on the topic with Ars drone aficionado Cyrus Farivar and his expert guest; your comments and questions are welcome. As the popularity…

The government recently announced its intention to launch a drone database requiring owners to register their remotely controlled flying machines. On Thursday it emerged the likes of Amazon, Google, and Walmart will be helping to shape the registry’s rules. The post Google, Amazon and Walmart invited to help shape drone registry rules appeared first on Digital Trends. View original article at Digital Trends

The FAA seems to have suddenly realized every dad in America is getting a drone for Christmas. So, it’s setting up a ‘drone taskforce’ to try and register every drone before U.S. airspace is shut down by a million plastic quadrotors. Amazon, Google and Walmart seem to be on board View original article at Gizmodo

There are few things more satisfying for a shotgun-wielding technophobe than dropping drones out the sky. But rarely do you see a kill as dead-on as this one. That’s a ball kick from a Rosmini College soccer player in New Zealand that landed squarely on a passing DJI Phantom 3 drone. The quadcopter had been recording the match before being hit and spiralling down near the goalpost. It’s hard to tell just how high up the drone was when it got nailed View original article at Motherboard

Artist’s depiction of using radiographic muons to peer inside pyramids. Image: HIP InstitutePyramids, the final resting places for ancient Egyptian pharaohs and queens, are pretty awesome to look at. But what’s just as fascinating for archaeologists, engineers, and the public is getting to the bottom of a 4500-year-old mystery: how were they built?In an attempt to answer that question, a team of researchers from Egypt, Canada, France, and Japan have joined forces under the aegis of the ScanPyramids Project, which is supported by the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities….