The Australian government passed a law in March that lets law enforcement collect, store and access potentially revealing information about its country’s internet users without a warrant.The law is set to finally take effect on October 13th, just over a month from now, giving some experts the feeling that a privacy dystopia is on the horizon down under. Given that the FBI has been crying wolf about the internet “going dark” for years, it also sets a worrying precedent that will likely be closely watched by other Five…

Some British guys built a massive network of drone propellers strong enough to lift one of them several feet off the ground. Though it technically ceases to be a drone once a person is seated in it, “Manned Aerial Vehicle” is not quite as catchy. A hexagonal network of propellers and motors is attached to a lightweight steel frame with a space to sit, and the pilot also appears to have some form of control via a joystick-like device. According to the creators, it can run for about…

A new drone that has been collaborated on by Sony has surfaced, and along with it are details that it can reach speeds of about 170 km/h for two hours, and it carry objects up to 10 kg, which is making strides in payload-carrying drones. According to specifications provided by Aerospace, Inc., the VTOL prototype weighs five kilograms, and is able to haul heavy objects for over two hours at a time up to a maximum speed of approximately 170 kilometres per hour. These drones won’t be for…

North Dakota lawmakers recently passed a law that will allow police drones to carry “less than lethal” weapons such as Tasers and tear gas Tasers, despite being known as a “less than lethal” weapon, were responsible for the deaths of more than 500 people in the United States from 2001-2012, according to an Amnesty International study. Many experts on law enforcement and military technology were surprised by the new law, though they don’t quite see it as a stepping stone to police drones armed with more dangerous weapons…

The US prison system costs almost four times more to run than the US education system. It doesn’t matter what your politics are—virtually everyone thinks this is wrong. So what can we do about it?As a transhumanist, I always look to science and technology to solve problems. The simple fact is that many criminals crowding our prisons—whether murders, drug dealers, or others—could be turned into law abiding, tax-paying citizens who live successfully amongst us. All they need is the proper supervision View original article at Motherboard

Image: Icelandic Institute for Intelligent MachinesThe Icelandic Institute for Intelligent Machines has a first-of-its-kind ethics policy: it is refusing to work on artificial intelligence, automation, or machine learning for military purposes, instead pursuing its research from a purely pacifist standpoint. “(T)he increased possibility — and in many cases clearly documented efforts — of governments wielding advanced technologies to spy on their law-abiding citizens, in numerous ways, and sidestep long-accepted public policy intended to protect private lives from public exposure has gradually become too acceptable,” the new policy reads….

Ever since SpaceX had its first launch failure in late June, those following the company have wondered it would shelve some of its more ambitious short-term plans in favor of focusing solely on returning to space safely. The answer, according to CEO Gwynne Shotwell, is absolutely not.Though there’s still no timetable for the next Falcon 9 rocket launch, Shotwell confirmed Monday that the company is moving forward with a plan to upgrade to a next-generation rocket, tentatively called the “Full Performance Falcon 9,” which is 30 percent more…

This next generation of drones are capable of recording breathtaking video footage, but can also be a nuisance for other travelers seeking tranquil moments. Original article at nytimes.com

In the latest chapter of the Los Angeles Police Department’s ongoing saga with unmanned aerial devices, a hobby drone derailed an LAPD helicopter this week while the police aircraft was attempting to locate a suspect in Hollywood. ABC7 in LA reports the drone came within 50 feet of the LAPD vehicle, redirecting the police’s attention towards finding the amateur operator. Eventually, authorities said they found the drone pilot in a Rite Aid parking lot. The man was taken into custody for interfering with police work, and the LAPD confiscated…

[Carsten] messed up. He was soldering an ARM CPU onto a quadcopter board in haste, failed to notice that the soldering iron was turned up to eleven, and pulled some of the traces up off the PCB. In the process of trying to fix that, he broke three pins off of the 100-pin CPU. The situation was going from bad to worse. Instead of admitting defeat, or maybe reflowing the CPU off of the board, [Carsten] lasered the epoxy case off of the chip down to the lead…