Called ICARUS, this DARPA-funded cardboard drone project is designed for flying those missions there’s no coming back from. The resulting UAV could do everything from delivering vaccines to batteries. The post These DARPA-funded cardboard drones are designed to deliver supplies, then disappear appeared first on Digital Trends.

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Ice skaters flocked to a new spot for the first time in more than 20 years: Trout Lake in a Vancouver park. A recent cold spell meant the lake was frozen solid and safe enough to skate and walk on for the first time since 1996.  But warmer weather this week means the January skate sessions were short-lived. At least we got the awesome drone footage of the winter wonderland before rainy, warmer weather again destroyed our skating dreams. Kate Hudson and James Corden get some dance lessons from the cutest toddlers While Trump goes off on an immediate vacation, Stephen Colbert goes off on a rant ‘A Clockwork Orange’ has more adaptation differences than you’d imagine This short film about a teenage mother is pure ‘heartbreak’ Read more

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The website of SkyPan International features a slideshow of panoramic aerial photos taken over Chicago and New York City. But, gorgeous as they are, any of them taken by a drone may have cost the company a huge chunk of cash. The Federal Aviation Administration settled a lawsuit with SkyPan on Tuesday to the tune of $200,000 after alleging the company had used drones to snap aerial cityscape photos from 2012 through 2014 without governmental approval.  SEE ALSO: The flying Lily Camera drone is dead, buyers will be refunded The FAA claimed SkyPan — a company that provides “aerial visual solutions” to a large list of clients in construction and real estate — had broken the law both by flying a drone for commercial purposes, which was not allowed during those years, and by illegally flying a drone over a heavily populated area. Read more

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A Chicago-based drone operator is to pay a record-sized fine to settle claims it carried out dozens of illegal flights.

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The security services will have enough on their plate at Donald Trump’s inauguration on Friday without having to deal with a load of hobbyist drone pilots trying to get some aerial footage of the event. So it’s warning people to leave their UAVs at home. The post Drone owners warned to keep their UAVs away from Friday’s inauguration appeared first on Digital Trends.

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