Drones are beginning to enable everything from search & rescue, to the delivery of medicines to hard-to-reach places. But they are also being used as cheap, and deadly flying bombs. How can we defend ourselves?
The post Death from above? How we’re preparing for a future filled with weaponized drones appeared first on Digital Trends.

View original article at Digital Trends

Whenever you hear the word “glue,” you probably think of those cute — albeit sloppy — arts and crafts projects you created as a kid. You know, the totally unsightly ones that your parents proudly hung on the refrigerator. Or maybe you think of your last DIY project that went really, really wrong. 
SEE ALSO: Learn to build your own robots, plus snag a DIY kit on sale
FiberFix’sTotal Glue is like the unicorn of your junk drawer. It combines the strength of super glue, the gap-filling properties of epoxy, and the light-curing speed of acrylic resin

View original article at Mashable

An Oregon company has developed a self-contained combination housing and launcher for tiny, GPS-guided surveillance drones. The housing can attach to almost any vehicle, including unmanned ground vehicles. Put them together, and you’ve built a robot that can deploy robots. Kelsey Atherton of c4isrnet has called it “the Inception of drones,” a reference to Christopher Nolan’s 2010 science-fiction film about artificial worlds inside of artificial worlds. The Black Hornet Vehicle Reconnaissance System, a product of FLIR Systems based in Wilsonville, Oregon, “equips armored or mechanized vehicles with an immediate, organic, and self-contained surveillance and reconnaissance system,” according to the company

View original article at Motherboard

Skydio’s clever R1 autonomous drone now has its own Apple Watch app, making flight preparations simpler than ever. The $2,000 flying machine is now also selling at its first retail outlet — Apple Stores in North America.
The post Skydio’s self-flying drone now has an Apple Watch app for flight prep appeared first on Digital Trends.

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In a test, a drone is seen ripping into an airplane's wing, doing more damage that a similarly-sized bird.

       

View original article at USA Today