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USA TODAY’s Jefferson Graham thinks the new gesture controlled DJI Spark drone is the wave of the future in computing.        

View original article at USA Today

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A DJI Phantom 3. Zimin.V.G. [CC BY-SA 4

View original article at Hack A Day

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With just two taps of a button, lights began blinking, propellers started to swirl, and a tiny camera set about studying my face. Release the miniature drone and it is instantly airborne.        

View original article at USA Today

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At the Bay Area Maker Faire last weekend, Intel was showing off a couple of sexy newcomers in the Single Board Computer (SBC) market. It’s easy to get trapped into thinking that SBCs are all about simple boards with a double-digit price tag like the Raspberry Pi. How can you compete with a $35 computer that has a huge market share and a gigantic community? You compete by appealing to a crowd not satisfied with these entry-level SBCs, and for that Intel appears to be targeting a much higher-end audience that needs computer vision along with the speed and horsepower to do something meaningful with it. I caught up with Intel’s “Maker Czar”, Jay Melican, at Maker Faire Bay Area last weekend. A year ago, it was a Nintendo Power Glove controlled quadcopter that caught my eye

View original article at Hack A Day

Agustin Zanoli from Cordoba, Argentina, was left with quadriplegia after a motorbike accident but he can now fly a drone at high speeds using a specially adapted VR headset.

View original article at Daily Mail Online